Release date Ubuntu 20.10 and planned functions

After the completion of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, the developers looked to the future Ubuntu 20.10, which should see the light 22 Oct 2020.

As a General observation, the court may; development release (by the way, under the code name “Groovy Gorilla”) is still at an early stage. But we already know few things such as, date of issue, estimated time of support, and some new features that the developers are going to add.

So keep reading to learn all you need to know about the features, changes and improvements Ubuntu 20.10. And since this post is regularly updated throughout the development process, feel free to add it to your favorites to be informed of progress over the next six months!

Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla”

The code name for Ubuntu 20.10 – “Groovy Gorilla”. Despite the fact that this alliterative combination gives us such opportunities as the previous code names, it is quite nice to create gorgeous illustrations in support of the release.

As for support, Ubuntu 20.10 is a short — term release (STR). And this means that it will be supported for 9 months permanent fixes major bugs, security fixes, and new releases of apps… and then nothing.

Although this window may seem too short, it is consistent with the tradition of Ubuntu LTS release every two years with interim STR.

In General, Ubuntu 20.10 will be the twenty-third version of this operating system based on Linux.

Release date Ubuntu 20.10

Release date Ubuntu 20.10 – 22 Oct 2020.

This date, along with dates for other phases of development planned for the next six months are listed on Launchpad aka the house of Ubuntu development.

Other important stages in the development cycle, Groovy Gorilla include:

  • Week of testing: July 3, 2020
  • The end of the appointment appetito UI: 17 September 2020
  • The beta release of Ubuntu 20.10: 1 Oct 2020
  • The end of the appointment updates the kernel: 8 Oct 2020.
  • Release candidate: October 15, 2020

Features Ubuntu 20.10

What new features will offer Ubuntu 20.10?

At the time when you read this post, all below, or just get in a fresh release, or have a very good chance.

As GNOME 3.38, which is due out in September. This release will be the basis of Ubuntu 20.10 and will contain a fresh batch settings UI and UX, and further improving performance.

Other notable improvements in GNOME 3.38 will include finalization of the new lock screen (but don’t get your hopes on the emergence of the pin unlocking), and delete (completely useless, between us girls) in the section “Common application” of grid applications.

The GNOME developers are also planning to work with the distance between the application icons in the application grid, to optimize the use of available space depending on the screen size of the user.

Full-featured registration fingerprint is something that is slowly beginning to happen now and some traces of this can be found in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, so expect to see and hear more news about this development until October.

At the moment Ubuntu 20.10 is under development with Linux Kernel 5.6, but most likely closer to the release date prompted a more recent Linux kernel, the practice shows that this is worth the wait. It is difficult to predict what exactly, but if the kernel releases will adhere to a schedule, may put the squeeze on and to version 5.8.

As for Groovy’s promise to solve the problem of “blurred background desktop” (again), as the planned upgrade of the dialog box “properties of software”, in accordance with the models created by a team of developers Canonical.

Also on the horizon will support the OEM cores (i.e. devices sold with Ubuntu). It will include a way to update the OEM packages online and feature a “way to celebrate that you are on a certified device”.

If you frequently run command-line processes which take some time, you probably will be interested to hear that the developers are considering the possibility to enable notifications for “end of process” by default. This is something that many other distributions of Linux, including Elementary OS, already provide.

Some things that I hope will be improved (but probably not)

There are a few small, in essence joints that I’d like to see Ubuntu finally fixed.

For example, the downstream distributions based on Ubuntu such as Pop! _OS, offer built-in recovery function. This makes it easier to roll back the system without having to download the files .iso and all that jazz. In 2020 it is strange that Ubuntu, also widely used desktop Linux operating system, it does not offer something as basic.

In addition, I can’t be the only one who finds the “new” version of Snap Center Software Center is absolutely useless when searching for apps, right? Every time you search the applications that I perform, the results are not related to each other apps Snap makes me frustrate today. It’s not what I actually looking for! 😆

Finally, the icons on the desktop.

Oh, dear

This extension GNOME … bad. It lacks the basic, essential features that you would expect. I mean, what if Ubuntu does not include it, let’s just say no one would have lost. I want to say: why would I want to promise behavior that I’m expecting, if it is actually there? It’s frustrating.

I also find extremely unpleasant is the fact that the desktop icons instantly disappear when you run screens “Applications” or “Actions”. Seamless pad would be much more appropriate. And now every time I think it’s a glitch or a failure that, given all the other shortcomings, I constantly expect.

Note on fields: I could probably come up with an article of small gripes, but enough for today!

Download Ubuntu 20.10

Ahead of the official, nominal, and final stable release, you can download daily build Ubuntu 20.10. These assemblies should not be considered reliable or used as the sole OS, but they offer a way to sign up and help test our upcoming release before its appearance in October.

Download Ubuntu 20.10 Daily Build (64-bit .iso)

But what do you expect from the upcoming release you, excellent share your wet dreams in the comments below.


Source: omgubuntu.ru

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